Tag Archives: nature photography

Fall 2018

5 Nov

Fall is here, death is here, but the flowers keep on flowering

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Perseids

15 Aug

The Perseids are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift–Tuttle. The meteors are called the Perseids because the point from which they appear to hail (called the radiant) lies in the constellation Perseus. The name is derived from the word Perseidai (Greek : Περσείδαι), the sons of Perseus in Greek mythology.

What we see as “shooting stars” is actually a cloud of debris – tiny pieces ejected by the comet Swift-Tuttle, as it travels along its 133 year orbit around the sun. These particles burn up in the earth’s atmosphere at around 80 km height. They are visible every year from July to August and reach maximum activity between August 9-14, depending on the location of the stream. During the peak, the rate of meteors reaches 60 or more per hour.

They can be seen all across the sky; however, because of the shower’s radiant in the constellation of Perseus, the Perseids are primarily visible in the Northern Hemisphere. [from Wikipedia]

Shown above are photos from my first attempt at capturing the “Perseids”. They occurred in pretty much all directions and I saw some brilliant trains high in the sky as well as fireballs just short above the horizon line. But it was difficult to photograph them.

I set up the camera towards the North East and the constellation Perseus, with the widest angle available (f 18 mm) and 30 seconds exposure time. And then I spent the following 2 hours pressing the shutter every 30 seconds…

The camera did capture a few Perseids as well as plenty of planes. The difference is that a plane shows a twofold and non-continuous light trace (because the plane lights blink periodically) whereas the train of a meteor shows as a thin, continuous bright line on the photo.

Later that night Auriga rose in the North and the Pleiades became visible in the North East. The camera caught a small train directly above the Pleiades.

Around 2 am the sky started to cloud and my photo session ended.

In the photos I marked some of the constellations and stars for orientation. I hope you enjoy this little excursion. I recommend to check this website for further reading: https://sternenhimmel-fotografieren.de/sternbild-perseus-perseiden-h-und-chi-herz-und-seele-herznebel-sternschnuppen-finden-beobachten-fotografieren/

Night Life and July Devils 2017

1 Aug

New series about the secret life taking place in the garden at night. Because these are sleepless summer nights and I am nocturnal again for various reasons.

I am spending most of my summer working and enjoying time in our garden. Hence dedicating again the monthly theme to this topic. The new flower beds are finished at last and new plants are added on a weekly basis. The black flower theme is coming along nicely. For more visit my garden blog.

June Devils 2017

1 Jul

 

Impressions from my month of June, including my ritual for the summer solstice 2017.

View the entire Flower Devils series here.

Wounds

14 Feb

A collection of photographs of wounds, scars and malformations on trees

Photography Exhibition Gotha

2 Nov
“Tree Lights/Way Home”
“Forest Land/Lachten”
Date: November 4th
Location: The Londoner – English Pub, Gotha
Opening: 6 pm
The exhibition opening coincides with the “Samhain Celebration – a night of extreme avant-garde music”.
presented and supported by:
DEAF FOREVER | The Londoner, Gotha | House of Inkantation | Eisenwald| Waldhalla – Das grüne Metal Mag | Photos of Kaos
Line-up:
MOSAIC  – Gotha | Germany 
Grift – Kinnekulle | Sweden
Farsot – Gotha | Germany
Vivus Humare  – Gotha | Germany 
SPECIAL GUEST #1: Teufelskunst
+ photo exhibition by Wiebke Rost Photography
Entrance: 6 pm
Begin: 8 pm
Tickets:
VVK: 15€, AK: 18€

Bees on our White Lavender

11 Jul

Every year, dozens of bees and bumblebees are collecting nectar and pollen on our white lavender. Now is that time again. The above photo was a lucky shot. My lens is not really suited for macro photography. But in this image all the details of the insect are clearly visible, whereas the surrounding has a nice bokeh effect, created by motion blur and depth of field. So here we go, another bee joins the “flower devils” photo series.